My post last Friday about the heat wave has provided some useful lessons in writing.

In that post, in case you missed it, I said the dew point, not the humidity, is to blame for our discomfort during a heat wave in these parts; and I received a comment arguing that it really is the humidity.

I’m always willing to admit when I’m wrong, but first I had to find out if I was wrong.  So I went straight to the horse’s mouth, and sent an email to the chief meteorologist at our local NBC affiliate:

Hi!

I posted about the heat wave on my blog yesterday, and I’ve received a response claiming that it really is the humidity, not the dew point, causing all the discomfort.  Is there any way either you or Matt might be able to find a moment to help clarify the difference?  If I’m wrong, I’d like to update the post with more accurate information.  Here’s a link to the comments in question (scroll up for the blog post itself):  https://melindahagenson.com/2013/07/19/pot-luck-yeah-its-hot/#comments

Thanks so much!

If you don’t live here locally, Matt is the junior meteorologist at the station.  Anyway, I received the following response late the following night:

Melinda.. Both dew point and relative humidity are closely related, likely causing the confusion, but in the end, it’s the amount of moisture in the air that makes us uncomfortable. The dew point temperatures would be more representative, because as you stated in the blog, you can have high relative humidity any time of the year and not feel so miserable. It’s because dew point is measured in degrees.. simply put, the temperature at which the air becomes saturated. The key is the relationship to temperature. Warmer air can hold more moisture, so the atmosphere has a higher water content when the dew point climbs. A higher moisture content and warmer air leads to the discomfort we feel.. conversely, higher moisture content at a low temperature would still lead to high relative humidity, but because the overall amount of moisture colder air can hold is much less, we don’t feel it the same way.

Hope this makes sense, and helps!

Darren Maier
Chief Meteorologist
WEAU-TV

It appears that what he’s saying here is that yes, the dew point provides an accurate prediction of the degree of discomfort we can expect, relative to the air temperature and the relative humidity. 

In other words, my commenter and I are both right.

But here’s the thing:  I didn’t mean to imply that humidity plays no role in human discomfort levels during a heat wave.  That was not what I meant at all.  In re-reading the post and the meteorologist’s response, I realized that I could, and should, have been clearer and more specific in my original post.

And here’s where the GUMP lesson comes in.  Two lessons, in fact.

The first is one that I did OK on.  I thought I might be wrong, and I checked my facts.  As writers, we need to keep an open mind.  We need to be willing to question our own assumptions, and above all, be willing to admit when we are wrong.  Have faith in our readers’ intelligence.  Even when you think you’re right, if you are challenged by a reader, you should check your facts before responding.

Stubbornness has no place in academia.  Remember,  A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds.  –Emerson

Emerson does not mean we shouldn’t be consistent.  He means we shouldn’t be foolishly consistent—or in other words, we should not cling to an opinion in the face of information that brings its accuracy into question.

Which leads me to the second lesson, which I didn’t do so well on last week, and that is to write clearly.  Be accurate.  This should go without saying, but it bears repeating.  Do not assume that just because you know what you mean, your audience will too.  Always read your work critically before submitting it, and try to read as if you were a member of your own audience.  What questions have you left unanswered?  Where might you be misunderstood?  Most of us have had the experience of having someone say, “What did you mean here?  I don’t get this part.”  And when this happens, it’s not the reader’s fault.  It’s yours.

Or in this case, mine.

This isn’t a lesson in meteorology.  It’s a lesson in writing.